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Jeannine (J'9) Maxwell
970-689-4824
j9@j9soldmine.com
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Jeannine (J'9) Maxwell
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970-689-4824
j9@j9soldmine.com
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Jeannine (J'9) Maxwell, Loveland Office





"Ethical, Knowledgeable, Friendly, Available, Energetic" are just some of the words that my past clients have used to describe me. I'm a Colorado Native, and have been helping people buy and sell homes since 2000. First time Buyer? Yay! Retiring and downsizing? Great. Looking for an investment Opportunity? Can't WAIT to help! Regardless of your Real Estate need, I'm here to help. I TRULY love what I do and I look forward to the opportunity to work with you!!!



Jeannine (J'9) Maxwell
970-689-4824

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In This Issue:



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What's Your Home Worth?



Jeannine (J'9) Maxwell
970-689-4824


March 2015
24 ways to spend your tax refund
Let's be practical here, for just a second. Tax season is the one time of year when, if you're lucky enough to get a refund, you have no better excuse to spend a few dollars updating/fixing/renovating your home. It's a key investment for your future, and with a large sum, courtesy of the United States government, we know you'll just be itching to take a trip to the closest Home Depot. Here's a great list of ideas (some practical, some clearly not) on things you can spend some of that tax refund money on to "spruce up" your home just a bit. From the tried and true -- updating your front door, updated flooring, etc. -- to the more "in this moment" trends, this list from RealtyTimes has you covered. Check it out!
Read the full Realty Times article Back to Top
Slash your electric bill with these hacks
Springtime can be one of the more cumbersome times of the year when it comes to the amount of energy and electricity your home uses. Especially in Colorado where the weather can fluctuate so much in the springtime that it's bright, sunny and warm one day, and reverses 180 into a massive blizzard that shuts down entire cities the next. This can do a number on your home's electricity needs -- which are already in high demand. This great list of tips from BobVila.com outlines 11 different ideas and tips for keeping the monthly energy costs at bay. In addition to simple things like using proper insulation and running larger appliances off peak hours, the wonderful world of technology now allows us to actually better track and monitor our home's energy usage. A cool new product called Neurio sensor, launched at the end of February. The Neurio sensor plugs directly into your circuit box and monitors all energy activity from your home -- so you can better see what's sucking up all your dollars each month. In addition to the new Neurio sensor, there are several other products you can use to detect an appliance's energy usage that are outlined on the article from Bob Vila.
Read the full article on BobVila.com
View the Neurio Sensor
Back to Top
Northern Colorado Economic Snapshot
Units Listed - Single Family & Attached Dwelling
Area Jan/'15 Jan/'14 % Change
Fort Collins 551 728 -32.1%
Greeley 332 307 7.5%
Loveland 363 398 -9.6%
Totals 1,246 1,433 -15%
YTD* Units Sold - Single Family & Attached Dwelling
Area 2015 2014 % Change
Fort Collins 212 172 18.9%
Greeley 109 117 -7.3%
Loveland 116 88 24.1%
Totals 437 377 13.7%
Source: Ires, LLC | *YTD represents through the month of January
At the end of December/2011, there were 1,964 single family home listings available for sale across Northern Colorado. That number shrank to 1,495 at the end of December/2012; 1,201 at the end of December/2013; and 985 at the end of December/2014. Thus we begin our fourth year of a listing drought in Northern Colorado and across the Metro Denver area, Mountain Communities, and the Boulder Valley.

There are pluses and minuses to the impact of a reduction in available housing inventory. On the plus side, scarcity creates demand, which in turn results in an increase in home values. Builders sense buyer pent-up demand and churn up ground for new homes, characterized by small lots and populated by pocket parks strewn throughout the subdivision. On the minus side, buyers often find themselves in a position where they can neither dictate a strong negotiating position nor dally in making a decision, as other buyers may come swooping in. To the victor belong the spoils, with the spoils meaning goods or benefit taken from the loser in a competitive situation.

From a pricing perspective, homes at an entry to mid-range price point sell the quickest, simply because there are more buyers in those price ranges. These buyers occupy three different levels of interest: (1) Entry Level (first-time buyers); (2) Move Up (buyers who need more room; normally due to a growing family); (3) Move Down (buyers who need less space; normally due to a dwindling family; the empty nester syndrome).

As the housing price point increases, the number of prospective buyers decreases. Although the overall Front Range real estate market has progressively improved since 2011, homes priced on the upper end have met with some resistance from buyers. As inventory levels continue near or at historic lows, and mortgage interest rates continue to vacillate in the 4% range for a fixed rate mortgage, look for higher priced homes to also be impacted positively from a sales perspective.

2015 promises to look a lot like 2014. Available inventory for Northern Colorado will continue to expand as the waning days of winter give way to spring. But like vultures eyeing a fresh kill (that may be a little dramatic), buyers will quickly gobble up homes priced within the parameters of what the marketplace will dictate. Remember that part about “to the victor belong the spoils”?

Home values will continue to increase, but are projected to rise more slowly. According to Forbes, nationally prices are near their spring 2005 levels. That was the time when home values reached a pinnacle and then began to retreat over the course of the next six years. The average price of a single family home in Northern Colorado in 2011, when the real estate market began to rebound, was $236,686. In 2014, the average sales value of a single family home in Northern Colorado was $288,862. That’s an average annual increase of around 5.50%.

Despite the increase in overall inventory, the vacancy rate for rental properties will remain below 5% for most areas. Look for rental rates to continue to increase in 2015.





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Jeannine (J'9) Maxwell 
Contact Info:
Direct Office: 970-689-4824
Email: j9@j9soldmine.com
 
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